Hospice – Page 3

It’s Hard to Cure Stubborn

“I’ll give you six minutes . . .”

70-90% of the population is right-handed. I’m one of them. When recovering from carpal tunnel surgery on my right wrist back in 2013, various mundane tasks became a tad challenging:

  • Being on or near a toilet (I’m keeping descriptions G-rated).
  • Zipping any zipper.
  • Tucking in my shirt.
  • Brushing my teeth.
  • Washing my left hand.
  • Putting on my dog’s collar.
  • Taking a shower.

All activity seemed an ever-changing obstacle course of once simple gestures and decisions. Fortunately, I have a wife willing to lend a hand. Unfortunately, I am a stubborn guy. She offered to help with my shirt-tucking endeavors. No way! Can I help you zip that zipper? I’ve got it! I relented on the shower. There’s only so many hours in the day and who wants to spend significant clock time air-drying rather than using a towel wielded by a different set of hands?

My ordeal lasted barely a week. Read More →

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The Wonder Pills

Hospice is one of the rare times when all the medical professionals involved in caring for a patient are on the same page.

I wonder how this relates to medications.

Prior to hospice care, it’s not unusual for one doctor to prescribe a pill for your cranky prostate and another doctor to make sure you’re taking a blood thinner and a third doctor to suggest an antidepressant. You, the thoughtful patient, will mention the various pills you’re taking to each physician. If a new doctor claims that a new “wonder drug” is worth trying, you will also tell him or her about the other medications. The doctor(s) will assure you that everything is compatible. The nurse(s) are also reassuring when you worry about your growing list of pills, tablet and doses. The pharmacist(s), of course, will add insights.

So many voices! So many pills!

Nowadays, as we grapple with the illnesses that come with the accumulation of birthdays, our medicine cabinets can become chock-full of prescription bottles. We want to feel better. Take that pill. We want to return to what we once felt like. Try this pill. Grace Slick of the long-ago ‘60s rock band Jefferson Airplane, famously sang . . .

One pill makes you larger
And one pill makes you small
And the ones that mother gives you
Don’t do anything at all
Go ask Alice, when she’s ten feet tall… Read More →

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Comparing That Death to This Death

Robin Williams and Matt Damon in 1997’s Good Will Hunting.

Which death is the most difficult to death with? On the list below, which person should be in “better shape” and has probably “moved on” in their life?

  • Her child was stillborn. It’s a year since the death.
  • His grandmother died from dementia. It’s a year since the death.
  • Their teen was killed in a traffic accident. It’s a year since the death.
  • Children gather to honor a father’s birthday. It’s a year since the death.
  • She lays a Christmas wreath on her husband’s grave. It’s a year since the death.

How would you rank them? (Should you rank them?)

Unfortunately, I think many folks—including me—publicly or privately rank the severity of another’s person’s situation. We compare and contrast with other facets of life: careers, homes, our child’s achievements, cars, last year’s vacation, and so forth. Advertising relentlessly reinforces judgment, from the new solar panels on the neighbor’s roof to the newest smartphone in a classmate’s hand. The people beside you or across the street or in the pharmaceutical commercial are better off than you. (Or, whew, they are a smidgen worse than you!)

If we compare the things of life, why not compare the ways of death? Read More →

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