Hospice SOBs

Some hospice patients have MOM charted for one of their prescribed medications.

Hey, who wouldn’t want a mother’s love when entering into hospice care? Mom knows best, right? But wait! MOM is one of hospice’s (and health care’s) endless acronyms, an abbreviation for the familiar Milk of Magnesia.

Then there’s SOB, which I’ve written about before . . . but every time I see it as a concern for a patient, I’m still taken aback.

The acronym means Short Of Breath rather than the curse, “You son of a _ _ _ _ _!” Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

When Loved Ones Die Alone

Please, I don’t want to face death alone.

I’d prefer to take a last breath in my home.

I long to die peacefully; in my sleep.

Not a burden; nor someone hard to keep.

Let me say the goodbyes,

Then close my eyes.

And . . . die.

Amen.

What would be your prayer?

What would be your hope?

What would be your plan? Or lack of plans, because some fickle or faithful part of nearly all of us are wishful thinkers, people that dread the hard conversations or avoid the unsettling subjects or put off until tomorrow—even the next decade—any conversation about the solemn, scary subject of . . .

Dying.

My death.

My parents wanted to grow old and die at home. The mortgage was paid. The landscaping well-tended and mature. The rooms held memories. There was cozy furniture and well-lighted spaces.

They did not die at home. Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Hospice Care and Your Coccyx (er, Derrière)

With apologies to our feathered friends…

The nurse gave her morning report on the condition of a patient, an elderly gentleman with congestive heart failure. She noted concerns about his food intake and breathing, confirmed he’d lost weight in recent weeks, and reminded other hospice staff about his fall on the way to the bathroom before he became a hospice patient.

“Anything else?” the hospice medical director asked.

After a glance at her laptop screen, the nurse responded, “Some skin tears around the coccyx. But it’s mostly under control and healing.”

The doctor nodded. Good job. Next patient. Read More →

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather