Archive for Home Health Aide

It’s Hard to Cure Stubborn

“I’ll give you six minutes . . .”

70-90% of the population is right-handed. I’m one of them. When recovering from carpal tunnel surgery on my right wrist back in 2013, various mundane tasks became a tad challenging:

  • Being on or near a toilet (I’m keeping descriptions G-rated).
  • Zipping any zipper.
  • Tucking in my shirt.
  • Brushing my teeth.
  • Washing my left hand.
  • Putting on my dog’s collar.
  • Taking a shower.

All activity seemed an ever-changing obstacle course of once simple gestures and decisions. Fortunately, I have a wife willing to lend a hand. Unfortunately, I am a stubborn guy. She offered to help with my shirt-tucking endeavors. No way! Can I help you zip that zipper? I’ve got it! I relented on the shower. There’s only so many hours in the day and who wants to spend significant clock time air-drying rather than using a towel wielded by a different set of hands?

My ordeal lasted barely a week. Read More →

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Please Say “Yes!” to a Home Health Aide!

Why would hospice patients say no to a home health aide?

At our weekly hospice team meetings, we review every patient’s current situation. This includes the various staff assigned to a patient’s care. It goes something like this:

What about Juan Lopez?

  • Nurse . . . two to three times a week
  • Social Worker . . . one to two times a month
  • Chaplain . . . phone contact only
  • Home Health Aide . . . declined
  • Volunteer . . . one to two times a month

What about Mary Jones?

  • Nurse . . . one time a week
  • Social Worker . . . two to three times a month
  • Chaplain . . . two to three times a month
  • Home Health Aide . . . declined
  • Volunteer . . . declined

Of course, the above names are fictional. In a typical meeting, the hospice where I work will talk in detail about scores of patients. We discuss the recent deaths and new admissions, along with all of the ongoing patients served in their homes or facilities. Every patient has a choice about which of their “team” provides direct support to them. However, every patient must be seen by a nurse, from as little as several times a month to (though rare) every day. It depends on the needs. Read More →

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Hospice Strangers at Your Door

It's like a crowd headed your way . . .

It’s like a crowd headed your way . . .

In 1989’s Field of Dreams, Kevin Costner’s character famously heard, “If you build it, he will come.” If you haven’t seen the film, I won’t reveal the enigmatic “he” that eventually arrived at the baseball field built on an Iowa farm.

I usually recall the quote as “If you build it, they will come” . . . since crowds did gather at that heaven-like spot of the Midwest.

Field of Dreams was a sweet fantasy, but the reality of hospice means that many strangers will also arrive at your house. While hospice care happens away from a person’s residence, 58% (according to 2014 data) of all hospice patients remain in their homes and the “team” from hospice knocks on your front door. Part of hospice’s appeal is allowing people to continue living in the place they know best: home. For some families, that appeal is undermined by the flood of “strangers” from hospice phoning to make appointments and soon parking on your street.

If only it was one “he” that arrived at the busy “field” formally known as your lovely, quiet home!

First it may be the admitting nurse that visits. Maybe she or he actually came to the hospital, and they shared about the great things hospice will do. You heard hospice’s wonderful promise about the patient—your beloved—being able to return home. Where do you want to die? (Research I’ve read indicates 7 in 10 prefer home.) You may never see the admitting nurse again once you’ve agreed to hospice, but I hope it was a good experience. I hope she helped you understand the hospice benefits. I hope he was able to answer many of your pressing questions. Read More →

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