Archive for Medicalese

Hospice SOBs

Some hospice patients have MOM charted for one of their prescribed medications.

Hey, who wouldn’t want a mother’s love when entering into hospice care? Mom knows best, right? But wait! MOM is one of hospice’s (and health care’s) endless acronyms, an abbreviation for the familiar Milk of Magnesia.

Then there’s SOB, which I’ve written about before . . . but every time I see it as a concern for a patient, I’m still taken aback.

The acronym means Short Of Breath rather than the curse, “You son of a _ _ _ _ _!” Read More →

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Hospice Care and Your Coccyx (er, Derrière)

With apologies to our feathered friends…

The nurse gave her morning report on the condition of a patient, an elderly gentleman with congestive heart failure. She noted concerns about his food intake and breathing, confirmed he’d lost weight in recent weeks, and reminded other hospice staff about his fall on the way to the bathroom before he became a hospice patient.

“Anything else?” the hospice medical director asked.

After a glance at her laptop screen, the nurse responded, “Some skin tears around the coccyx. But it’s mostly under control and healing.”

The doctor nodded. Good job. Next patient. Read More →

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Hospice: Understanding the Unpronounceable

In a hospice meeting, there were a dozen or so huge, clunky words on several patients’ charts that underscored my medical ignorance. But one stood out because it had appeared on a couple of charts and was the longest of all of them:

Thrombocytopenia

Because it’s easy to scour the internet for clues after seeing the strangest of words written on patient summaries or spoken by hospice colleagues, and because my search included the Mayo Clinic’s website, I’m confident that,

Thrombocytopenia is a condition in which you have a low blood platelet count. Platelets (thrombocytes) are colorless blood cells that help blood clot. Platelets stop bleeding by clumping and forming plugs in blood vessel injuries.

Thrombocytopenia often occurs as a result of a separate disorder, such as leukemia or an immune system problem. Or it can be a side effect of taking certain medications. It affects both children and adults.

Knowledge is power. Knowledge leads to better choices and decisions. Knowledge can be the difference between feeling overwhelmed and helpless vs. planning and taking future steps.

Nonetheless, some words intimidate. And not just in the medical/hospice realm. Like many kids in my generation, the film “Mary Poppins” introduced us to the silly and ridiculously long:  Read More →

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