Archive for Safety

In Hospice: To Bed or Not To Bed?

hospital beds

The rational reasons for using a hospital bed make a long, persuasive list. But you don’t care . . .

Who would want one?

Does anyone really like ‘em?

They have cranks and levers, wobbly wheels, and are cumbersome to move or adjust. Newer models are often complex, with silent electric motors, links for computer cables, and (though pricey) lightweight metal alloy frames.

But who seeks to be horizontal in a hospital bed of any kind? Not for overnight, and certainly not for the remainder of your life. Whenever the hospice clinical staff discusses current patients, it’s nearly inevitable that at least one patient has recently balked at shifting to a hospital bed. I view the hospital bed as one of the intimidating symbols of hospice care. Of course, it’s more than a symbol once it arrives at your home.

Wouldn’t you refuse?

We like love our bed in our bedroom. It’s a sanctuary. Don’t all the health care experts tout the value of a good night’s sleep? Whether retired, in a part-time job, or with a stressful career (along with raising kids, volunteering, and don’t forget yard and house work), doesn’t everyone desire to sleep every day? Do the personal math: we’re on a mattress more than we eat, work, play, exercise, procrastinate, shovel snow, mow a lawn, or take a vacation. Hey, for some, a little sleep is as close as they’ll get to a vacation for long stretches of time. Work is demanding. Families are demanding. At least let me escape into my cozy bed! Read More →

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On Guns and Hospice: Is Everyone Safe?

“Is it safe?”

That was the riveting question repeatedly asked in the 1976 film Marathon Man. During a grim and crucial scene, Sir Laurence Olivier’s menacing character demanded—as he wielded dental equipment in the worst way—to know if what he planned to do could be safely accomplished.

“Is it safe?”

Dustin Hoffman’s “innocent man” paid an excruciating price for every hesitation, every uncertainty.

I sometimes think of that scene when one of our hospice’s social workers announces that a patient’s house is safe. When we talk about a new patient entering hospice care, the question about safety must be asked and answered.

Which is to say, are there are any guns in the home? Read More →

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The Foley Catheter

Where did the Chevrolet brand name come from?

Where does the Chevrolet brand name come from?

Out of respect for the slightly squeamish, the dedicated avoiders, and the overly nervous, I’ll start with a trivia quiz.

What do Louis Chevrolet, Rudolf Diesel, Jack Foley, Bill Gore, Jules Leotard, and John Stetson all have in common?

Have you ever owned a Chevy? How about a Chevy with a diesel engine? While you were driving that vehicle, did you toss a Gore-Tex jacket onto the seat because the forecast called for rain? Before you entered the car, had you been to yoga in your leotard? Maybe, because it’s your favorite hat, a Stetson was already jauntily positioned on your head? Read More →

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